Industrializing Illinois (1877-1917)

Following the Civil War, Illinois continued to grow in population, diversity, and complexity. Large-scale heavy manufacturing and a growing commercial sector joined agriculture as major employers of a rapidly growing population. Immigration continued, with African Americans from the South and southern and eastern Europeans joining more established groups. Conflicting interests sometimes led to unrest, strikes, and even violence. During this period, Illinois also became a center of exciting new movements in art, architecture, and literature.

Eastern Massasauga Rattlesnake (Sistrurus catenatus)

Image of Massasauga Rattlesnake model.
The Eastern Massasauga Rattlesnake is a small, venomous snake recently listed as threatened by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It persists in only a few locations in Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin. The Fish and Wildlife Service describes the Massasauga as “a small snake with a thick body, heart-shaped head and vertical pupils.”

Roosevelt’s Africa Hunting Trip

Image of horns from Theodore Roosevelt's hunting trip.
Former president Theodore Roosevelt presented six pairs of antelope horns to the Illinois State Museum in 1910 following a year-long hunting trip to East Africa. Roosevelt’s trip was billed as an expedition to collect specimens for the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. Roosevelt was a big-game hunter, but he was also a naturalist at heart, having created his own natural history museum in his room as a child.

Hoy & James Pharmaceutical Bottle

Image of Hoy & James Pharmaceutical bottle.

Springfield, Illinois

1901-1906

Embossed: “HOY & JAMES/DRUGGISTS/EAST SIDE SQUARE/SPRINGFIELD ILL.”

And on base: “BREED/W.B.M. CO.”

The pharmacy of Edward M. Hoy and Dr. A. C. James was located in Springfield at 122 South Sixth Street from 1901-1906. Medicines sold there included Dr. Rankin’s Kidney Tablets, Kodol Dyspepsia Cure, and Mystic Cure of Rheumatism and Neuralgia. The mark on the base of the bottle identifies its maker as the Western Bottle Manufacturing Company of Chicago that opened the same year as Hoy and James.

Dodds’ Drug Store Pharmaceutical Bottle

Image of Dodds' Drug Store Pharmaceutical bottle.

Springfield, Illinois

Ca. 1894-1901

Embossed: “DODDS’ DRUG STORE/SPRINGFIELD ILL”

Whithall Tatum Co., of Millville, New Jersey, manufactured this bottle that may have been filled with medicines like Dr. Caldwell’s Syrup Pepsin (to cure indigestion, constipation, sick headache, or stomach trouble) or Dodds’ Cough Syrup (for coughs and colds). Both products were advertised for sale at Dodds’ Drug Store operated by Richard N. Dodds at Fifth and Monroe Streets in Springfield.

Clarkson Pharmaceutical Bottle

Image of Clarkson Pharmaceutical bottles. (shows tall Clarkson bottle back left and small version front right)

Springfield, Illinois

Ca. 1906-1930

Embossed: “ROBERT CLARKSON/MODERN DRUGGIST/SPRINGFIELD, ILL” and on the base, “C.L.G. CO.”

While the oval shape and reinforced lip finish of this bottle are typical for drug bottles of the time period, its large size is not. What sort of medicine was sold in this quantity is unknown. The bottle was made for Clark’s Drug Store, in Springfield, Illinois, at 213 South Sixth Street. Robert Clarkson operated the business from 1906 to 1930. A newspaper advertisement announcing the opening of Clarkson’s “New Modern Drug Store” states that “Mr. Clarkson needs no introduction,” having "previously worked as a prescription clerk at Stuart Broadwell and as a partner in Clarkson & Mitchell’s Drug Store.”

Brown Pharmaceutical Bottle

Image of Brown Pharmaceutical bottle, The Golden Lion.

Springfield, Illinois

1880-1897

Embossed “J.B. BROWN/DRUGGIST/&/BOOKSELLER/SPRINGFIELD/ILL”

The embossed image of a lion using a mortar and pestle is noticeably subtle and is not in as stark relief as the words and images on other bottles. No one knows for sure why the lion was chosen as the symbol of Joel B. Brown’s apothecary in Springfield, Illinois.

Broadwell Pharmaceutical Bottle

Image of Broadwell Pharmaceutical bottle.

“Meet me at Broadwell’s.”

They said this in “Young Mr. Lincoln’s” time – and they say it today.

~“Young Mr. Lincoln” was a theater production advertised in 1939.

Close inspection of a bottle produced for sale at the Stuart Broadwell Drug Store in Springfield, Illinois, shows the minor imperfections and bubbles in the handmade blown glass. Whitall, Tatum Co., of Millville, New Jersey, manufactured the bottles with the druggist’s name embossed on the side.

Bressmer Pharmaceutical Bottle

Image of Bressmer Pharmaceutical bottle.

Ca. 1889-1914

Embossed “THE John Bressmer/ Co./ SPRINGFIELD, ILL” and “C.L.G. CO”

John Bressmer’s dry goods business remained at the same location in downtown Springfield, Illinois, for his entire 54-year career. Whitall, Tatum Co., of Millville, New Jersey, produced this embossed, blown glass bottle for Bressmer’s store.

Telephone

Image of Telephone made by Kellogg Switchboard & Supply Company, 1906.
This phone was made by the Kellogg Switchboard & Supply Company of Chicago in 1906. Known as the Microphone 1, this model was the first telephone in the United States to integrate a transmitter and a receiver into a single handset. Between 1900 and 1910, the number of telephones in use in the United States went from 600,000 to 5.8 million.

Porcelain “China” Doll Head

Image of porcelain doll head.
Like the detailed Staffordshire transfer print plates used for dining, residents on the Illinois frontier also imported other goods from Europe, including toys. This porcelain doll head, along with other pieces, was recovered from a cistern at the Huggins Farmstead Site in Perry County.

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